class action plaintiffs

We have been keeping up with the In re LendingClub Securities Litigation class action, No. 3:16-cv-02627-WHA in the Northern District of California (“LendingClub”), in regard to Judge William Alsup’s unusual decision to require additional briefing from the class plaintiff before agreeing to the class plaintiff’s choice of class counsel.  Now, as the LendingClub Plaintiffs oppose the Defendants’ motions to dismiss, Plaintiffs’ counsel is highlighting a recurring trend in motion to dismiss practice: defendants arguing facts at the motion to dismiss stage, particularly in complex cases.

Continue Reading LendingClub Update: Class Plaintiffs Claim Defendants Are “Arguing Facts” on a Motion to Dismiss

We posted earlier about the surprising decision of Judge William Alsup of the Northern District of California not to appoint lead counsel in the LendingClub class action cases at the same time he appointed a lead plaintiff.  Instead, the judge ordered that candidates for lead counsel must submit applications to the newly appointed lead plaintiff, who would then move the court—via their current counsel, who was allowed to apply but not to receive special treatment—to approve the lead plaintiff’s choice.

That process has now concluded, and in a short order dated October 28, 2016 (“Op.”), Judge Alsup held that lead plaintiff’s current counsel, Robbins Geller, was an appropriate selection as class counsel.  Specifically, “the Court [was] persuaded that the selection of Robbins Geller was within the scope of several reasonable choices and was not influenced by any pay-to-play considerations.” (Op. at 1.)

Continue Reading UPDATE: Court in LendingClub Class Action Appoints Lead Plaintiff’s Counsel as Class Counsel

In a recent decision in the now-consolidated LendingClub class action cases, Judge William Alsup of the Northern District of California appointed a lead plaintiff but unexpectedly declined to appoint lead counsel at the same time.  Instead, the judge ordered that candidates for lead counsel must submit applications to the newly appointed lead plaintiff, who will then move the court—via their current counsel, who is allowed to apply but not to receive special treatment—to approve the lead plaintiff’s choice.

Continue Reading Court in LendingClub Class Action Requires Due Diligence by Lead Plaintiff Before Approving Lead Counsel

There have been several recent and interesting updates to the In re Petrobras Securities Litigation, 14-cv-9662 (S.D.N.Y.) that we have discussed several times on this blogFirst, the Second Circuit has decided to accept review of the class certification question.  Second, Judge Jed Rakoff denied a motion to stay the underlying proceedings (including the impending trial) pending the Second Circuit appeal in a decision that called the class action “arguably secondary” to the numerous opt-out proceedings.  Finally, several plaintiffs have voluntarily dismissed their claims with prejudice—but without explanation.

Continue Reading Recent Developments in Petrobras Class Action Could Interfere with Trial Date

Ever since the Supreme Court issued its opinion in Morrison v. National Australia Bank, Ltd., 561 U.S. 247 (2010), courts have been making their own interpretations of what Morrison means for whether certain transactions are “domestic” and thus amenable to class-action securities claims.  Judge Dean Pregerson of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California recently weighed in with a May 20, 2016 opinion (“Op.”) dismissing all claims with prejudice in the Stoyas et al. v. Toshiba Corporation class action, No. CV 15-04194, for failure to allege that the alleged fraud involved domestic transactions.  Although the opinion considers certain Japanese-law claims, the key question the Court addresses is whether Morrison allows claims to be brought based on transactions in unsponsored American Depositary Shares for non-U.S. companies.

Continue Reading Federal Court Declines to Exercise Jurisdiction Over Toshiba Despite Over-the-Counter ADS Sales in the United States

We speculated in September that a decision to grant summary judgment against a class member in the long-running In re Vivendi Universal, S.A. Securities Litigation, 02 Civ. 5571 (SAS) (S.D.N.Y.) “could have implications for class members, but more likely for opt-outs.” Now Judge Shira Scheindlin, in what may be one of the well-known judge’s final decisions before stepping down from the bench, has granted summary judgment against another class member while relying heavily on her prior decision. The Court determined that, because the evidence established that the investment analyst had anticipated Vivendi’s liquidity issues (the subject of the fraud) and established that the class member continued to buy Vivendi shares after the end of the class period, Vivendi had successfully rebutted the presumption of reliance and established that the class member “was indifferent to the fraud.”

Continue Reading Update: Vivendi Wins Summary Judgment Against Another Class Member As Litigation Winds Down

The deadline for parties to object to the settlement in the In re Credit Default Swaps Antitrust Litigation, Master Docket No. 13-MD-2476 (DLC) in the Southern District of New York recently passed on February 29, 2016. Unlike in most cases, where parties typically only object to settlements to the extent they allocate attorneys’ fees, several potential settlement class members to this litigation (“CDS Litigation”) have made specific, substantive objections to the potential distribution of settlement funds. In class plaintiffs’ (“Plaintiffs” or “Class Plaintiffs”) memo of law in support of approval of the settlement, Plaintiffs responded forcefully to these objections. Although Judge Denise Cote has yet to decide whether to approve the settlement, it is worth examining these new objections, which may suggest a trend in class-action settlement objections—at least in antitrust cases relating to securities transactions—moving forward. In addition, Plaintiffs’ heavy reliance on experts to create a settlement model may reflect another trend worth keeping an eye on.

Continue Reading Will Antitrust Cases Relating to Securities Transactions Invite More Objections Because of Their Complexity?